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Pet Nutrition

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We encourage you to contact us with any questions or comments you may have. Please call our office or use the quick contact form below.

 
 

From the very first day you bring a new kitten home through the final days of its life, nutrition plays a critical role in your cat’s overall health and well-being. Many cat owners take nutrition for granted, in part because the availability of so many nutritionally complete commercial diets has taken much of the guesswork out of choosing a suitable diet for a cat. However, did you know that your cats nutritional needs change with age and activity level? Did you know that specially formulated diets can assist in the management of various medical conditions, including kidney disease, diabetes, arthritis, and heart disease? Do you know how many calories your cat should have each day and whether you are over- or underfeeding? Are you comfortable reading and interpreting pet food labels?

Whether your cat has special dietary needs or simply needs to shed (or gain) a few pounds, our nutritional counseling services can help you accomplish your goals and keep your cat in good health. We offer counseling in dietary selection and feeding practices for cats during various life stages, such as growth (kitten), adult, and the “golden years.” If your cat has a medical condition, we can help you select the most appropriate diet to suit his/her needs.

It can be easy for a cat owner to become overwhelmed by the available selection of pet foods, all of which claim to have specific benefits for pets. We can offer expert advice to help you negotiate the complicated array of choices. Let our nutritional counseling service help you achieve and maintain optimal nutrition for your cat.

Pet food classifications:

The following pet food classifications are as defined by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO).

By-products – Pet food that contains by-products which are declared clean and free from foreign substances and bodily waste.  These are the parts of the animal that we don't want to eat like the organ meat, but are actually essential to a well balanced diet in a cat.  

Natural – Natural pet food is defined as having ingredients that are obtained entirely from plants, animals, and/or mined sources. Natural pet food is free from all chemical processing.

Organic* – Organic pet food is, at minimum, 95% produced and handled in observance of all USDA National Organic Program requirements.

*If advertised as 100% organic, then 100% of the ingredients (including additives) must be organic.

Keep in mind that a pet food classification does not dictate superiority. Many pet food manufacturers market their natural or organic foods as being better than pet foods with by-product, but that isn’t always the case. Some organic and natural foods lack the vitamins and minerals that a food with by-product can offer. The main goal of pet food is to maintain a nutritious and balanced diet; this can be obtained with the right pet food, regardless of what category it fits into. If you need help choosing proper pet food, our veterinary staff will happily provide you with our recommendations.

Prescription diets

Medicated diets are created to augment nutritional needs for pets dealing with illness or disease. A variety of manufacturers design pet food specifically for pets suffering from allergies, arthritis, cancer, diabetes, kidney disease, liver disease, pancreatitis, and more. If you think a medicated diet would benefit your pet, contact our office today.

Supplements

As your pet ages their need for phosphorus, sodium, calcium, and protein lessen while their need for fiber increases. Dietary supplements can help meet your pet’s needs as they age. Supplements also offer therapeutic function. Vitamins and glucosamine are just some of the beneficial supplements available for your pet. Please discuss with your veterinarian if you think dietary supplements would be helpful for your pet.

Common pet food concerns

 Q: Is there a substantial difference between kitten food, adult cat food, and senior cat food?

A: Young pets, adults, and elderly animals all have different nutritional needs, and therefore need different diets. Puppies and kittens need higher proteins and more fats, while elderly pets need more supplements integrated into their diet. Neglecting to acknowledge your pet’s specific nutritional needs could result in negative health effects.

Q: How do I know if my cat has a food allergy? And what do I do next?

A: Most food allergies result in ear infections or skin problems especially on the head or neck, both of which can be difficult to detect in your pet.  Try changing their pet food to a higher quality brand, or change the flavor of food. For example, often pets are allergic to chicken or lamb, but not both. Wait 6-8 weeks after introducing the new food to see if your pet’s habits change. If you are still having issues and can’t find an appropriate food, our veterinarians might be able to offer a medicated diet.

Q: Can my pet benefit from a raw diet or homemade meals?

A: Because raw meats can contain E. coli and Salmonella it is recommended that you do not feed your pet raw meat. While a raw diet can provide an abundance of protein, it lacks in other vital nutrients and can be harmful to older pets.

Homemade meals can be beneficial for your pet when prepared by a licensed pet nutritionist. Many of us believe that because homemade meals are healthier for humans, they must also be healthier for pets. When properly balanced, a homemade diet can be beneficial, but unless you have extensive knowledge of pet nutrition, preparing your own meals can be harmful to your pet.

Q: Are there pet treats meant for obese animals?

A: While most pet treats are usually high in fat and calories, there are options for overweight animals. Many gourmet pet treats are sweetened with honey rather than sugar which cuts down on the carbohydrate content.  A good rule to follow is that treats should never consume more than 10% of your pet’s total food consumption.

Q: There are many TV commercials that state corn is unhealthy for my pet’s diet. What is wrong with corn?

A: It used to be a common belief that corn was the number one cause for pet food allergies. However, current studies show that less than 3% of pet food allergies are caused by corn, and more than 70% are the result of chicken, beef, dairy, or wheat. If your pet is not allergic to corn, it is highly beneficial to include it in a pet’s diet, because it offers several antioxidants and is an excellent source of proteins that help with muscle and tissue growth.


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